Poster Design by Skye Louis

Listen to the description of the poster

This Basic Income poster is hand printed in 2 layers on large white paper with bright, high contrast colours. The ink layers are neon yellow and black.

At the top is a neon yellow cloud with raindrops falling from it. There are large letters that say ‘BASIC INCOME’ across the yellow cloud. Just underneath the cloud, float the words “SO ALL OUR COMMUNITIES CAN GROW”. Inside each yellow raindrop is a different hand-drawn object in black: a cellphone, shoes, a pill bottle, loose coins, and a banana.

In the centre of the poster, growing up from the yellow ground is a young plant with several leaves on it. Alongside the plant are three hand-drawn figures printed in black ink. The one on the left is a person turning a giant cog. The cog is rolling into a track. In the track are also 5 flowers in a row. The flowers get bigger as they get closer to the bottom corner of the poster. The biggest three flowers have petals made up of five hands surrounding a dollar sign. The other two figures are a person with glasses and a bun, wearing a dress. This person has one foot in the air and is holding on to one end of a house. Pulling on the other end of the house is a big line-drawn monster, taller than the house, with dollar signs for eyes. The home is being torn in half.

At the bottom left of the poster are the words “basicincomecalgary.ca” outlined in black ink on a white background.

The Gallery

Social Prosperity

by Alberta Rose / Ingniq

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

What a basic income means to Alberta Rose / Ingniq

Alberta Rose (aka Ingniq) believes in the potential of universal basic income and the positive impact that it would have on members of her community, family, and self in removing financial barriers to education, healthcare, and work. Having access to UBI would allow Alberta and other artists the opportunity to create more work through added stability and access to resources, such as studio space, and reduce the financial stress of paying rent, bills and student loans.

Universal basic income would help people like her retired father, who are living on a limited fixed income with sudden, unexpected expenses. People, like her brother, who was in a life-altering car accident and couldn’t work steadily afterwards, could access mental and physical health assistance. Single parents, like her friends, could access childcare so that they could work or go back to school, and people who have health issues and disabilities and cannot work would have secure housing and lower mental stress that financial instability causes.

Looking at What We Need  / digital art

by Mary Salvani

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

What a basic income means to Mary Salvani

In an ideal world, basic income would help me and my parents (who are seniors living on a very small pension) pay for the rising cost of items needed to survive: food, clothing, utilities, bills, rent, transportation, and medical supplies.

During difficult times, for example during the current pandemic, basic income would help pay for items such as masks, disinfectant, and hand sanitizer.

Basic income could also help people pay for further education. For example, it would help me pay for whatever tuition and other expenses my current bursary does not cover.

Happy Money

by Yunsun Lee

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

What a basic income means to Yunsun Lee

Basic income can make all my family happy with feeling of secure life, so I can try to do whatever I like to do, not whatever I should do.

World and Money

by Alison Cherer

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

What a basic income means to Alison Cherer

Basic income means more money for clothing and art supplies.

Planting Seeds of Dignity

by Alisha Marie Adams

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

What a basic income means to Alisha Marie Adams

I am a single woman with mental illness. I have PTSD and bipolar disorder. If I’m in an episode it’s difficult to do any of my normal activities. I would greatly benefit from a basic income. It would allow me to get better quicker, to keep a roof over my head and food in my fridge, to keep me out of crisis. It would allow me time to self-manage my illnesses.

I work with vulnerable populations and artists with disabilities. I see the difference between families who are supported by families and have a basic income to survive. AISH only goes so far, and as we know, the government continues to decrease support. I don’t think people realize how big of a community we have that need financial and other types of support.
My family still lives in Nova Scotia. My step-mother is out of work but not eligible for disability, so my dad is preparing to work well past his retirement age. I see the stress that this causes my family. If for whatever reason people are not able to work, they will worry about supporting their family. It’s just not enough, and it’s really frustrating.

I think that we should take care of each other and each other’s families. In the Mi’kmaq community, we take care of each other. We trade work for food and help our neighbours.

A basic income means that people would have more passion in their lives.

Ripple 1 / Encaustic

by Penny Gunderson

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

Ripple 2

by Penny Gunderson

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

What a basic income means to Penny Gunderson

With a basic income, everyone has their needs for food, shelter, and clothing covered by a basic and reliable amount of income. It is the idea of providing for all so we can concentrate on higher-level needs like education, spiritual growth, relationships, and development of skills and talents for the benefit of all.

Being on AISH and CPP Disability, Penny has her basic needs provided at a subsistence level. She can afford a very modest place to live and food to eat. Her medication costs are covered, and she does not need to worry if there will be income in upcoming months. She still needs to be extremely careful with her expenses, but she has breathing room in knowing her most basic necessities are covered. This has allowed her to explore her art at the pace that her health allows. It also helps Penny to deal with the depression and anxiety that extreme deprivation would deepen.

We Can Buy Flowers

by Colleen Peters

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

The photograph represents the connectedness with others and the harmony within individuals’ lives, which is what Colleen considers life’s goal.

We Can Buy Flowers II / Photograph

by Colleen Peters

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

Tree of Basic Income
Poem by Colleen Peters, artist at play

Basic Income Guarantee is like tree
That was a seed,
That was planted long, long ago.
Needs a little water, lots of light and room
to room spread its mighty leaves.

And can you tell feel its shade
As food insecurity is lifted, Praise the Lord

And children don’t go hungry
either
Do teens and adults.
Secure to make dream come true
Mental health lifeten up, worry and anxiety gone.
So much more I value myself,
No longer cry till dawn.
I even can have a family I can support, my friends,
I can make my dreams come true cause now cna pay the rent.

I can hear my family, neighbours, friends and cohorts rise to sing.
There is no one watching me for little mistakes
Only feeding me encouragement and supporting me
with the leaves of the tree of Basic Income Guaranteed.

One of my dreams is to support myself as an artist, multidisciplinary,
I’ve been practicing so long.
Are the people of this bright new world ready for intense words, colours and beyond?

Candles shine brightly as we walk holding the light hears afloat
Bringing light to dark and dusty roads,
Each special person carries within themselves a knowing
when you give someone their worth basic needs are met.

High emotional costs.
Unloading the weight of debt. Give a chance for savings, holidays and retirement.
Dreams can take you so far.

Now we go in action to the hall and roar!
Listen to us people
before you make a sore.
Vote for basic income guarantee
vote for framiles, single and doubles.
Its nice to have fresh flowers it nice to have
Its nice to have a bookshelf full of friends you’ve yet to meet.

Basic Income Guarantee is like tree
That was a seed,
That was planted long, long ago.
Needs a little water, lots of light and room
to room spread its mighty leaves.

Tree of Basic Income / Poem

by Colleen Peters

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

What a basic income means to Colleen Peters

Basic income would really help with groceries, bills, and rent, especially for populations who may not receive enough support in their current programs. Some people I know who are on income support instead of AISH don’t have enough to live on.

Basic income means having the support to live well and to take care of myself. Simple pleasures, like buying fresh flowers, help to support my wellbeing.

I worry that support programs like basic income could change with the change of government, and that we use basic income as another support and not take away from the supports already in place and working.

In a Hole

by Kathy M. Austin

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

More Pasta Than We Can Eat

by Kathy M. Austin

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

Whirlpool

by Kathy M. Austin

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

Amaze

by Kathy M. Austin

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

Tug-O-War

by Kathy M. Austin

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

Cash Crop

by Kathy M. Austin

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

What a basic income means to Kathy M. Austin

Kathy has been poor. She’s also experienced “the good life.” Six days before her husband lost his executive job in oil and gas in 2014, they flew to Churchill, Manitoba, to see polar bears. During four years of unemployment and zero income, Kathy applied for jobs but could never secure enough income to pay the mortgage and groceries. Tom got a job as a bus driver, but COVID-19 closed the schools.

For Kathy, who may not qualify for AISH, a basic income could calm her fears of losing their house. Repeatedly, Kathy and Tom offer gratitude for the donated food they receive, but they would rather eat food they choose. Coronavirus gave the world a taste of their lives void of restaurant meals, movie theatres, and travel.

The Seasonal Construction Worker

by Melissa Knive

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

The Loon

by Melissa Knive

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

Beached, Don’t Dali

by Melissa Knive

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

A Drop in the Bucket

by Melissa Knive

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

Vultures

by Melissa Knive

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

The Eye of the World

by Melissa Knive

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

Substance Not Flash

by Melissa Knive

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

UBI + YYC =

by Melissa Knive

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

UBI Doug and the Slugs

by Melissa Knive

YYC Arts Collective for Basic Income

What a basic income means to Melissa Knive

Through the ego-crushing experiences and her happy introduction to life on a basic income of sorts (through AISH), Melissa has been able to face past and present issues and form more of a psychological wholeness that she hadn’t achieved before. If those who have travelled down a road of painful development might get a respite through the tool of a universal basic income, and if some pain can even be prevented, it will surely prove its value.

Special thanks to:

Steering Committee of Basic Income Calgary Action Dignity, Disability Action Hall, Engineers Without Borders — Calgary Chapter, Poverty Talks, The Alex, Social Workers for Social Justice, Women’s Centre of Calgary, Vibrant Communities Calgary, and We’re Together Ending Poverty

Financial Partners for Basic Income YYC Arts Collaborative Calgary Scope Society/Disability Action Hall, Calgary Arts Development Association (CADA), Calgary Foundation Neighbourhood Grants

Artist Referral Collaborative Organizations/Groups Action Dignity, Basic Income Calgary, Calgary Social Workers for Social Justice, Disability Action Hall, Vibrant Communities Calgary, Women’s Centre of Calgary, Elephant Artists Relief, Studio C and Indefinite Arts.

Administrative Support for Basic Income Calgary’s “Educational Outreach Team” Ben Patmore, Colleen Huston, JD Derbyshire, Rosemary Brown, Raina Schnider, Kurt Archer

Consulting Calgary Artists/Artist Organizations Burnt Toast, Alberta Printmakers Association, Elephant Artists Relief (EAR), Jared Tailfeathers, Indefinite Arts Centre, Skye Louis, Studio C (Prospects)

Photographs of art and Artists by Emily Cox-Robertson